georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

An American observation post in Korea, in early 1953. By mid-1951, the battle lines had stabilized, straddling the 38th parallel that had divided the two countries in the beginning. The war would continue for two more futile years, with little change in the front lines, but the continual grind of fighting and casualties. Negotiations for an armistice were slow, only bearing fruit in July of 1953, bringing an end to hostilities and establishing a heavily patrolled DMZ between the two sides along the lines of battle.
A true peace treaty would not come to pass however, leaving the two Koreas dividing the peninsula, and remaining antagonistic towards each other.
(Chinnery)

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

An American observation post in Korea, in early 1953. By mid-1951, the battle lines had stabilized, straddling the 38th parallel that had divided the two countries in the beginning. The war would continue for two more futile years, with little change in the front lines, but the continual grind of fighting and casualties. Negotiations for an armistice were slow, only bearing fruit in July of 1953, bringing an end to hostilities and establishing a heavily patrolled DMZ between the two sides along the lines of battle.

A true peace treaty would not come to pass however, leaving the two Koreas dividing the peninsula, and remaining antagonistic towards each other.

(Chinnery)

Reblogged from georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov

deutschemark:

September 1, 1870 - The Battle of Sedan

After a disastrous attempt to free the besieged Army of the Rhine at Metz, in which the French lost 5000 men, Napoleon III’s Army of Châlons retreated to Sedan. The Maas Army, the Prussian Third Army and the Bavarian I Corps, under command of Generalfeldmarschall Count Helmuth von Moltke, King Wilhelm I and Baron Ludwig von der Tann, encircled the French Army.

At the end of the day, after heavy fighting, intense bombardment and with no hope of breaking out, Napoleon called off the attacks. The next they, the Emperor surrendered himself and his entire army to the Prussians.

September 2, the day the French surrendered, became an unnofficial holiday. Two weeks after the victory at Sedan, the Prussians started the siege of Paris.

1,2,3. Carl Steffeck - General Reille delivers to King Wilhelm I the letter from Emperor Napoleon III - 1884 - Ruhmeshalle, Berlin, destroyed in WWII

4. Wilhelm Camphausen - Otto von Bismarck escorts Emperor Napoleon III after the Battle of Sedan - 1877 - DHM, Berlin

5. Wilhelm Camphausen - Emperor Napoleon III and Otto von Bismarck  after the Battle of Sedan - 1878

What a time to be alive.

Reblogged from nordvolk